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3 Fresh Water Fish That Are Great For Your Aquarium - From A To B

Here are three fresh water aquarium fish (Angel Fish, Badis and Black Widow) you can add to your aquarium. Their special characteristics and aquarium requirements are covered: colors, temperament, temperature, breeding and feeding.

Angel Fish - Pterophyllum scalare (Family: Cichlidae)
One of the most beautiful aquarium fish it swims slowly and elegantly and is ideal for a community tank. But note that they can grow to 15 cm long as adults so bear that in mind when calculating the number of fish for your aquarium. They can accommodate a wide range of temperature. Food wise give them a variable diet.

The Angel Fish has a thin oval silvery body with long fins curving backwards. Vertical black stripes go from the eye through the body to the caudal fin. You will know when the fish is frightened as the dark stripes practically disappear. These stripes can hardly be seen in the Black Angel fish as the body is dark colored. The Lace Angel has fins with a black lace effect on them and a darker body then the norm. The Veil Tail Angel is a marble color and has much longer fins.

Unfortunately differentiating between the two sexes is extremely difficult. But when you do get a pair and they mate they act as good parents and will stay as a pair. Wide leaved thickly planted plants are needed for the breeding tank with low light conditions. After a couple of days the fry will hatch from the sticky eggs. You should be aware that eggs and fry may be eaten by these fish if they are frightened - so do not frighten them! Feed the very hungry fry with infusoria initially before moving on to micro worms and brine shrimps.

Badis - Badis Badis (Family: Badidae)
There is really no such thing as a definitive color for these fish due to the large number of variations. They range from nearly mauve to a reddish color and sometimes there are even red spots on the body. And they change color depending on their environment or if they are breeding! Noticeable features are a dark stripe through the eye, a long dorsal fin and lines around each scale. The dorsal fin may have blue green vertical stripes in it.

Normally only live food will be taken by them and a temperature range of 20 to 26 degrees Centigrade is suitable with hiding places provided by a thickly planted aquarium. The Badis gets on with other fish so is alright for a community tank. However they can argue amongst themselves but injury is unlikely.

Before pairing them up for breeding, bear in mind (no pun intended) that if the female is not bigger than the male then she can be seriously injured by the male. As the Badis is a cave dweller then use a flower pot on its side in a thickly planted breeding tank at 29 degrees Centigrade. After the eggs have been laid in the pot take the female out of the tank and wait till the eggs have hatched before taking the male out. Feed the fry on infusoria.

Black Widow - Gymnocorymbus ternetzi (Family: Characidae)
Ideally suited to a community aquarium the Black Widow is a popular choice for a fresh water aquarium fish, being peaceful and only growing up to 6.5 cm in length. It is particularly badly affected by poor water quality so take note. Look out for signs of it swimming with its head down and take immediate action. Although a variety of foods can be used it is best to use live foods.

The fish has bright eyes circled with red and a silver green shiny body with vertical dark bands. Seeing the differences between the sexes is not easy but the female has a fatter body and the male has wider anal and frontal fins and sharper dorsal fins. One end of the breeding tank should be thickly planted and you should also have floating plants with the water at 24 degrees Centigrade.

Eggs are scattered about with some dropping to the bottom of the tank and some sticking to the plants. Take both fish out of the tank immediately after spawning and after two to three days fry should appear. They should be fed on infusoria to start with followed by micro worms and daphnia.

Here are three fresh water aquarium fish (Angel Fish, Badis and Black Widow) you can add to your aquarium. Their special characteristics and aquarium requirements are covered: colors, temperament, temperature, breeding and feeding.

Angel Fish - Pterophyllum scalare (Family: Cichlidae)
One of the most beautiful aquarium fish it swims slowly and elegantly and is ideal for a community tank. But note that they can grow to 15 cm long as adults so bear that in mind when calculating the number of fish for your aquarium. They can accommodate a wide range of temperature. Food wise give them a variable diet.

The Angel Fish has a thin oval silvery body with long fins curving backwards. Vertical black stripes go from the eye through the body to the caudal fin. You will know when the fish is frightened as the dark stripes practically disappear. These stripes can hardly be seen in the Black Angel fish as the body is dark colored. The Lace Angel has fins with a black lace effect on them and a darker body then the norm. The Veil Tail Angel is a marble color and has much longer fins.

Unfortunately differentiating between the two sexes is extremely difficult. But when you do get a pair and they mate they act as good parents and will stay as a pair. Wide leaved thickly planted plants are needed for the breeding tank with low light conditions. After a couple of days the fry will hatch from the sticky eggs. You should be aware that eggs and fry may be eaten by these fish if they are frightened - so do not frighten them! Feed the very hungry fry with infusoria initially before moving on to micro worms and brine shrimps.

Badis - Badis Badis (Family: Badidae)br> There is really no such thing as a definitive color for these fish due to the large number of variations. They range from nearly mauve to a reddish color and sometimes there are even red spots on the body. And they change color depending on their environment or if they are breeding! Noticeable features are a dark stripe through the eye, a long dorsal fin and lines around each scale. The dorsal fin may have blue green vertical stripes in it.

Normally only live food will be taken by them and a temperature range of 20 to 26 degrees Centigrade is suitable with hiding places provided by a thickly planted aquarium. The Badis gets on with other fish so is alright for a community tank. However they can argue amongst themselves but injury is unlikely.

Before pairing them up for breeding, bear in mind (no pun intended) that if the female is not bigger than the male then she can be seriously injured by the male. As the Badis is a cave dweller then use a flower pot on its side in a thickly planted breeding tank at 29 degrees Centigrade. After the eggs have been laid in the pot take the female out of the tank and wait till the eggs have hatched before taking the male out. Feed the fry on infusoria.

Black Widow - Gymnocorymbus ternetzi (Family: Characidae)
Ideally suited to a community aquarium the Black Widow is a popular choice for a fresh water aquarium fish, being peaceful and only growing up to 6.5 cm in length. It is particularly badly affected by poor water quality so take note. Look out for signs of it swimming with its head down and take immediate action. Although a variety of foods can be used it is best to use live foods.

The fish has bright eyes circled with red and a silver green shiny body with vertical dark bands. Seeing the differences between the sexes is not easy but the female has a fatter body and the male has wider anal and frontal fins and sharper dorsal fins. One end of the breeding tank should be thickly planted and you should also have floating plants with the water at 24 degrees Centigrade.

Eggs are scattered about with some dropping to the bottom of the tank and some sticking to the plants. Take both fish out of the tank immediately after spawning and after two to three days fry should appear. They should be fed on infusoria to start with followed by micro worms and daphnia.

About the author: Paul Curran is webmaster at Fresh-Water-Aquariums-Guide.com and provides a care information system for fresh water aquariums.

Get your FREE E-Course on how to set up and maintain a beautiful aquarium, have the healthiest, happiest fish around AND learn more about fresh water aquarium fish.

Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/pets-articles/3-fresh-water-fish-that-are-great-for-your-aquarium-from-a-to-b-2175581.html

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    fish experts! come help with my tiger barbs?
    ok im gonna give you a bit of history.
    first tho: 55 gallon. not a new tank. previously had 2 platies, 6 neons, 1 rainbow shark, 10 tiger barbs, and 2 german blue rams.

    the newest addition to my tank were the rams. i noticed my tiger barbs stated becoming inactive. they just kept floating in the trees doing nothing. this isnt uncommon i know, but they did it 24/7. THEN i also had noticed a couple ick spots on the rams, so i looked up how to treat them. i didnt use any medicine, so i decided to take out 5 gallons of water, and dose the tank for salt. i think i put 2 or 3 teaspoons per gallon. i also raised the temp up. i put the water in the tank slowly over like 7 hours, and hoped to see a difference.

    the ick calsified, and fell off the ramps. all the other fish seemed to suffer like a plague hit the tank. my barbs were losing color. my barbs would swim, then lose control like they were in space. they'd be floating at the very top, or floating at the very bottom. over the days theyd lose more and more control, probably 80 percent. a couple of the barbs were constantly picking off/kissing/pecking off scales off of my two green tiger barbs..which is weird to me..after awhile barbs dropped left and right. i lost a neon. my rainbow shark looked real sick, infact..all fish looked like they were about to die EXCEPT my rams, whove been fine the WHOLLE time.

    anyways, i posted my situation on here, and osmeone said i pretty much poisoined my fish with salt. so i started doing water changes. the barbs seemed to be getting better sometimes, but then seemed to lose control again, anyways, all of my barbs died. i lost a neon. and i lost both my platies. my shark made it, and rams did too.

    fast forward a week 1/2 or 2, and also i probably managed to change out a whole tank worth of water, plus more over all that time.

    a fish store was having an annviersary sale. 50 percent off all fish. so i decided to get 10 tiger barbs. all died within 3-4 days except two. im guessing it might have just been a bad stock, since the worker said he had dug out 20 dead rummy nose tetras just that morning! so anyways, the two left over were doing ok, and then i went to petco to get one to see if it was just that stores stock, and this little guy was doing ok too.

    a day or two later, i got 7 new fish from my fish store i usually went to, and it was fun seeing all 10 barbs swimming from side to side again. last night i saw behavior of two barbs kissing eachother on the lips repeatedly over and over, and circling eachother real fast, and kinda flicking off eachother. is that just a pecking order?

    anyway, now today theres a couple swimming, or screwing around with other barbs, but the majority of them are all just on one side of the tank floating from bottom to mid level of the tank in a still posistion. they're all like vertical, with their head downards... one albino barb is floating almost completely vertical (head down) and keeps getting pushed around or licked/pecked by the other barbs and he doesnt seem to care.hes also breating fast..not gasping, but hes oving his mouth real fast.

    honestly i feel like giving this up now. i dont know what else to do. i just changed about 11 gallons of water last night too just to make sure my water was good (and it is, it always has been except when i first had problems with my first batch of barbs i actually had some ammonia)..like could there be something in my gravel? cause they pick at my gravel sometimes for food i think, and since i did syphon on hte gravel a bit last night, maybe i stirred up some parasite or something? maybe i should just dump out all the gravel and get new kind (i kinda want sand anyway)

    im just real scared im seeing real early stages of what happened awhile ago. maybe im just paranoid and right now in this hour my fish are just taking a rest so they're just being stagnant.

    i will check this often, so if you leave me with a question, bookmark this page and just check back cause ill reply with an update answer for you. or you can email me: godworks700@yahoo.com
    i wasnt causing any big bioload on my tank.

    i had all my fish for MONTHS. so my tank was used to the bioload of 10 tiger barbs (which were double the size of these young ones i have)

    and im aware how to cure ick, my main concern is the fishs health right now, and whats causing them to act how they do.

    • ANSWER:
      There's two ways to treat ick. Either the salt method (1 T. per 5 gallons) or Ick Guard or another medication for Ick. With salt you raise the Temperature of the tank and with meds you do not. With medications you remove the charcoal if using it and with salt you do not.

      Ick can be hard to kill and especially in a tank that is cooler. Temps for tropcial fish should be near 76-78. When Ick is visible to the human eye, it can not be killed. That is the shell of the parasite attached to the fish. It will fall off when full of blood, fall to the bottom of the tank, reproduce and in a week you'll have thousands more. It must be killed and in order to do that you need to continue treating the tank for a week after you no longer see the ick.

      The medications are far faster than the salt method and with salt you have to maintain a higher temp which can also add stress to the fish. Ick Guard and some of the Ick medications can kill the ick very quickly.

      I would suggest that any fish you buy go into a hospital quarantine tank. You can pick up a 5 gallon for and get a sponge filter for it. This save new fish infecting your current stock. Quarantine new fish for 2 weeks.

      I believe you lost your fish because you added so many at once causing an ammonia spike. When adding fish, you can't over load your bacteria. I believe if you'd have tested the water and did water changes your fish probably would have survived.

      If you use medications and have bottom dwellers that are scaleless, use half doses or get the medication for sensitive fish.

      Vaccumming the gravel also helps pick up Ick eggs.

  2. QUESTION:
    fish EXPERTS. come in here for help. im gonna test your skills.?
    ok im gonna give you a bit of history.
    first tho: 55 gallon. not a new tank. previously had 2 platies, 6 neons, 1 rainbow shark, 10 tiger barbs, and 2 german blue rams.

    the newest addition to my tank were the rams. i noticed my tiger barbs stated becoming inactive. they just kept floating in the trees doing nothing. this isnt uncommon i know, but they did it 24/7. THEN i also had noticed a couple ick spots on the rams, so i looked up how to treat them. i didnt use any medicine, so i decided to take out 5 gallons of water, and dose the tank for salt. i think i put 2 or 3 teaspoons per gallon. i also raised the temp up. i put the water in the tank slowly over like 7 hours, and hoped to see a difference.

    the ick calsified, and fell off the ramps. all the other fish seemed to suffer like a plague hit the tank. my barbs were losing color. my barbs would swim, then lose control like they were in space. they'd be floating at the very top, or floating at the very bottom. over the days theyd lose more and more control, probably 80 percent. a couple of the barbs were constantly picking off/kissing/pecking off scales off of my two green tiger barbs..which is weird to me..after awhile barbs dropped left and right. i lost a neon. my rainbow shark looked real sick, infact..all fish looked like they were about to die EXCEPT my rams, whove been fine the WHOLLE time.

    anyways, i posted my situation on here, and osmeone said i pretty much poisoined my fish with salt. so i started doing water changes. the barbs seemed to be getting better sometimes, but then seemed to lose control again, anyways, all of my barbs died. i lost a neon. and i lost both my platies. my shark made it, and rams did too.

    fast forward a week 1/2 or 2, and also i probably managed to change out a whole tank worth of water, plus more over all that time.

    a fish store was having an annviersary sale. 50 percent off all fish. so i decided to get 10 tiger barbs. all died within 3-4 days except two. im guessing it might have just been a bad stock, since the worker said he had dug out 20 dead rummy nose tetras just that morning! so anyways, the two left over were doing ok, and then i went to petco to get one to see if it was just that stores stock, and this little guy was doing ok too.

    a day or two later, i got 7 new fish from my fish store i usually went to, and it was fun seeing all 10 barbs swimming from side to side again. last night i saw behavior of two barbs kissing eachother on the lips repeatedly over and over, and circling eachother real fast, and kinda flicking off eachother. is that just a pecking order?

    anyway, now today theres a couple swimming, or screwing around with other barbs, but the majority of them are all just on one side of the tank floating from bottom to mid level of the tank in a still posistion. one albino barb is floating almost completely vertical (head down) and keeps getting pushed around or licked/pecked by the other barbs and he doesnt seem to care.hes also breating fast..not gasping, but hes oving his mouth real fast.

    honestly i feel like giving this up now. i dont know what else to do. i just changed about 11 gallons of water last night too just to make sure my water was good (and it is, it always has been except when i first had problems with my first batch of barbs i actually had some ammonia)..like could there be something in my gravel? cause they pick at my gravel sometimes for food i think, and since i did syphon on hte gravel a bit last night, maybe i stirred up some parasite or something? maybe i should just dump out all the gravel and get new kind (i kinda want sand anyway)

    im just real scared im seeing real early stages of what happened awhile ago. maybe im just paranoid and right now in this hour my fish are just taking a rest so they're just being stagnant.
    i will check this often, so if you leave me with a question, bookmark this page and just check back cause ill reply with an update answer for you. or you can email me: godworks700@yahoo.com
    i have a 20 gallon tank, but its been sitting outside on the porch for a couple of months..would i have to rinse it out, or can i just put gravel and water in it, and get it running? it hasnt been rained in or anything i dont think.

    anyways, its not the shark. hes very small, maybe an inch 1/2 long, and is very very shy. he is just always scavaging by himself, or just hiding.

    theres a nice forest of tall plants on the left, and a long with hide aways on the right, that the fish enjoy.

    • ANSWER:
      first bad situation definitely sound like you give your fish an O.D. of tonic salt all the symptoms fit, this time it looks like your barbs have split in to two groups i have only see this once before, (fighting for territory)do they lock mouths and spin in a vortex fashion if it is then it could be a pecking order going on? or the rainbow shark can be a bit of a dark fish sometimes all i can say keep a close look at fins to see if there is any rips or tears. hope this helps good luck

  3. QUESTION:
    identify my fish please? o.O?
    My dad bought a pair of tropical fish some time ago for our tank, and since then one of them ( the female i think ) died. The other fish has been on its own since then and seems quite happy. Thing is, my dad can't remember what fish he bought, the sales person didn't give much information, local stores aren't sure what it is and it'd help to know what species it is to make sure it suits a new habitat. I've found similar varities before, but none close enough, and I'm sure it's a cichlid. Please help asap, and thanks in advance.

    I managed to snap a shot of it too..

    Image and video hosting by TinyPic

    Picture doesn't quite do it justice. It really is quite a beautiful fish, 3" long and it changes colours. Fins can go pale green or deep blood red, and the spots can fade and you see large, thick vertical stripes down its sides instead, either red or brown.

    Thanks for any help again.
    http://i14.tinypic.com/8egi6hw.jpg

    here's the direct link, seeing as that one might be a tad confusing..

    • ANSWER:
      This looks like it could be the fish you have; a Severum.

      Photos found here, the first and fourth pages show a Green Severum and that looks very much like your picture. http://www.aquahobby.com/gallery/e_severum.php


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